Leslie Lohman Museum

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This section is provided to help extend our programming to a wider audience. As not everyone is available to attend our events, we will provide Video clips from our major talks and our Leslie-Lohman Speakers Series. Check back as we will be continually adding content to this page.

 

Speaker Series:

Leon Mostovoy Artist Talk


Leon Mostovoy’s "Transfigure" lecture at the Leslie-Lohman Museum. During the program, the audience was encouraged to interact with the project website, transfigureproject.com. The artist’s goal is to create synergy by connecting trans communities regardless of locale.

Mostovoy’s lecture was followed by his "Transfigure" exhibition at Leslie-Lohman's Price Street Project Space February 26-28.

For more information about the artists visit: leonmostovoy.com

Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Leslie-Lohman Speakers Series is an annual program presenting artists, curators, and cultural icons to the public. The series explores the role of art making in the LGBTQ community and contributes to the cultural and artistic activity of New York City. Lectures are free and open to the public. Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; and educational grants from the Arcus Foundation and the Keith Haring Foundation

 

Speaker Series:

Individual Mythologist: Vulnerability, Generosity, and Relationality in Ulay’s Queer Feminist Self Imaging with Amelia Jones


The Leslie-Lohman Speakers Series presents art historian Amelia Jones. Chair of the Visual Culture department at McGill University, Jones is one of the most well recognized queer, anti-racist, feminist art historians working today. She has lectured throughout the world and the author of numerous publications.

On March 14, Amelia Jones presented a lecture based on her paper entitled “Individual Mythologist”: Vulnerability, Generosity, and Relationality in Ulay’s Queer Feminist Self Imaging.

This talk explores the performance and performative self-imaging practice of the German artist Ulay, who has lived and worked in Amsterdam and Ljubljana since the late 1960s. Jones explores the qualities of generosity, vulnerability, and relationality as having queer feminist effects (and affects). Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and is in partnership with the University of Buffalo.

The Leslie-Lohman Speakers Series is an annual program presenting artists, curators, and cultural icons to the public. The series explores the role of art making in the LGBTQ community and contributes to the cultural and artistic activity of New York City. Lectures are free and open to the public. Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, in partnership with the University of Buffalo; and educational grants from the Arcus Found

 

Panel Discussion:

Takin’ it to the Streets: Performing Public Protest


Takin’ it to the Streets: Performing Public Protest panel discussion with introduction and moderation by Kris Grey featuring Jill Casid, Shaun Leonardo and Ed Woodham.

The very notion of public space is one that is marked by bodies and actions. Generally, public space is social space open and accessible to people. More than just a place to gather or pass, public space is also monitored, administered, and patrolled. The use of a space by bodies in alliance constitutes that space as public. Reciprocally, when bodies gather and appear to one another in the street, on the corner, in a park, etc their presence and appearance in those spaces constitutes those bodies as the “public.” In the recent years the world has witnessed the utilization of public spaces for large-scale demonstrations with far reaching political significance from the Arab Spring to Black Lives Matter. Takin’ it to the Streets explores what happens when public space is activated as a site for civic engagement by social art for artistic resistance.

Jill Casid is Professor of Visual Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she founded and served as the first director of the Center for Visual Cultures. A historian, theorist, and practicing artist, her contributions to the transdisciplinary field of visual studies include her monographs, books, and many essays. Her recent solo exhibition, Kissing on Main Street, brilliantly positioned a series of polaroid objects “at the four-way intersection of sex, imaging technology, vulnerable exposure, and policing that is public intimacy”. Each photographic object was a record of intimate exchange in a public space.

Shaun Leonardo is a multi-disciplinary artist and cultural producer. He has an M.F.A. in Painting from the San Francisco Art Institute and a B.A. in Visual Arts from Bowdoin College. In 2015 Shaun won two Franklin Furnace awards both for his individual work and his work with collaborators Melanie Crean and Sable E. Smith on Mirror / Echo / Tilt. Leonardo’s practice interrogates the construction of masculinity at the intersections of race and class. He’ll share his recent work I Can’t Breathe, which takes as its referent a public act of violence.

Ed Woodham is a multi-disciplinary artist and arts educator dedicated to working in public space. He is best known for the public art project, Art in Odd Places (AiOP), a festival that happens along the length of 14th Street in Manhattan every October. AiOP is a 10 day-long performance piece, created by a number of curators, artists and designers, and comprised of performances and installations from artists all over the world. Wood ham and his team produce AiOP as an art project and in part as a response to the increase post-911 of policing in public space.

Kris Grey is a gender-queer artist whose work exists at the intersection of communication, activism, community building, storytelling, lecture, and studio production. Grey earned a Bachelor of Fine Art from the Maryland Institute College of Art and a Masters Degree in Fine Art from Ohio University. Grey is the Exhibitions and Communications Manager at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art.

Takin’ it to the Streets is a program run in conjunction with The 1970s: The Blossoming of a Queer Enlightenment, on display from April 8 to July 3rd, 2016

The 1970s: The Blossoming of a Queer Enlightenment explores the vibrant and liberating decade between the Stonewall Riots from 1969 until 1980, just before we heard the first rumblings of the AIDS crisis emerging, changing the nature of sexual relationships to the present day. This historic exhibition features over 115 works from the Museum’s extensive collection of over 24,000 objects including artwork made during this significant period in LGBTQ history. Works have also been borrowed from the Lesbian Herstory Archives and the Falls Library, and it will include the entire "X Portfolio" by Robert Mapplethorpe (1978), recently purchased and accessioned into the Museum’s permanent collection. It was this iconic body of work, made during the 1970s, that led to the Culture Wars of the following decade."The 1970s" explores themes of political activism, body/self, fashion/style, and sexual freedom/expression.”

 

Speaker Series:

Gutter Art: Stephen Varble and Genderqueer Performance on the Streets of 1970s New York with David J. Getsy


The Leslie-Lohman Museum Speakers Series presents David J. Getsy’s talk which explores performance artist, playwright, and fashion designer Stephen Varble (1946–1984), who was a fixture on the streets of SoHo in the 1970s, but whose ephemeral practice has largely gone unrecognized in histories of art. His guerrilla practice aimed at disruption — of commerce, of gender roles, and of the institutions of art and celebrity. In elaborate sculptural garments made of street trash, Varble held unauthorized gallery tours through SoHo and protest performances in banks, Fifth Avenue stores, and in the street.

A favorite of photographers such as Greg Day, Peter Hujar, and Jimmy DeSana, Varble’s art performed gender transformation and hybridity for both popular and art audiences in the 1970s. Over the past five years, David Getsy has been recovering the story of Varble’s work through interviews and private archives, and he will present this new research that, for the first time, discusses the range and complexity of Varble’s artistic practice.

David J. Getsy is the Goldabelle McComb Finn Distinguished Professor of Art History at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His books include Abstract Bodies: Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender (Yale University Press, 2015), Scott Burton: Collected Writings on Art and Performance, 1965-1975 (Soberscove Press, 2012), Rodin: Sex and the Making of Modern Sculpture (Yale University Press, 2010), and most recently Queer for the Whitechapel Gallery’s “Documents of Contemporary Art” book series (MIT Press, 2016).

The Leslie-Lohman Speakers Series is an annual program presenting artists, curators, and cultural icons to the public. The series explores the role of art making in the LGBTQ community and contributes to the cultural and artistic activity of New York City. Lectures are free and open to the public. Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; and educational grants from the Arcus Foundation and the Keith Haring Foundation.

 

A Deeper Dive:

Jonathan David Katz in conversation with Geoffrey Hendricks, Andrea Evans, and Brad Melamed, discussing the work of Brian Buczak


A Deeper Dive artist, Brian Buczak came of age during the rise of performance and conceptual art in the late 1970s. Trained in these practices, he was associated with Fluxus in his early years, largely through the relationship with his then boyfriend, Geoffrey Hendricks, an important Fluxus figure. Buczak took up figurative painting at a time when it could not have been more unpopular to do so. But it offered him a personal iconography to address political issues. For this lecture, curator, Jonathan David Katz, engages Buczak's former partner, Geoffrey Hendricks, as well as Buczak's friends, Andrea Evans, and Brad Melamed, in conversation about Buczak's life and work.

 

A Deeper Dive:

Jonathan David Katz in conversation with John Dugdale


Legendary photographer John Dugdale, whose career largely coincided with an AIDS diagnosis, discusses his work with A Deeper Dive co-curator Jonathan D. Katz. Dugdale has been an active, celebrated photographer despite AIDS-related complications that have left him nearly blind.

 

Speaker Series:

Hunter Reynolds: Survival AIDS “Into the Light”


A panel comprised of his collaborators Babirye Leilah Burns Sculptor, Raphaël Sanchez - Photographe, Vincent Tiley, and Gail Thacker, discuss Hunter's recent performance "Survival AIDS Into the Light", created at the Bronx Museum for the "Art AIDS America" exhibition along with other performances. Tracing a lifetime of collaborative practices, the panel discusses performance art as a shamanistic healing tool and community building as a queer survival strategy.
Moderated by: Kris Grey
Videos by: Conrad Ventur
With Ritual Objects by:
Dietmar Busse, Joel Handorff, Jorge Clar, Sam Gordon, Ethan Shoshan, Shelley Marlow, Joe Westmoreland, AlanTimothy Lunceford-Stevens.

Hunter Reynolds concluded the event by announcing the creation of his legacy foundation The Hunter Reynolds Patina du Prey Foundation for the Arts.

Hunter Reynolds is a visual artist and AIDS activist, was a an early member of ACT UP, and in 1989 co-founded Art Positive, an affinity group of ACT-UP to fight homophobia and censorship in the arts. For over 25 years, Reynolds has been using performance, photography, and installations to express his experience as an HIV-positive gay man living in the age of AIDS. Reynolds’s works address issues of gender identity, political, social, and sexual histories, mourning and loss, survival, hope, and healing.

Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; and educational grants from the Arcus Foundation and the Keith Haring Foundation.

 

Speaker Series:

Aaron McIntosh:Queer / Southern: Roots / Diasporas


In his talk, "Queer + Southern: Roots + Diasporas" Aaron McIntosh addresses the historic and contemporary creative cultural production of queer Southern artists, as well as the impacts of migration, brain-drain and rural/urban divides on artists' lives.

Aaron McIntosh is a fourth generation quiltmaker and cross-disciplinary artist whose work mines the intersections of material culture, family tradition, desire and identity politics in a range of works including quilts, sculpture, collage, photography and writing. McIntosh received his BFA from the Appalachian Center for Craft and his MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. He has exhibited work widely throughout the United States and his critical writing has appeared in the Brooklyn Rail, Hyperallergic. McIntosh is a recipient of two Windgate Fellowships (2006, 2015) and a Maryland State Arts Council Grant (2013), as well as residencies at Haystack Mountain School of Craft and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts. McIntosh has taught in the Fiber Department at the Maryland Institute College of Art and at James Madison University. He currently lives and works in Richmond, VA, where he is an assistant professor and Fiber Area Head in VCU's Department of Craft/Material Studies.

Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; and educational grants from the Arcus Foundation and the Keith Haring Foundation.

 

Speaker Series:

Sophia Wallace


Sophia Wallace focuses on her work "CLITERACY", new projects, and shares some early work and personal anecdotes.

This talk explores how from ancient history to the modern day, the clitoris has been discredited, dismissed and deleted — and women’s pleasure has often been left out of the conversation entirely. Sophia Wallace challenges the lies, questioning the myths and rewriting the rules around sex and the female body.

Sophia Wallace had no desire to make art about the clitoris. As a queer conceptual artist, she knew exactly how the art world — and the world in general — would react. But just as writers say their stories find them, it was the absence of the clitoris in visual culture that found and haunted Wallace. In this talk, the artist shares the journey of her viral project and it's connection to her life and activism.

Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and is in partnership with the University of Buffalo.

 

Panel Discussion:

Gay Life in the 1970s in New York City


Gay Life in 1970s NYC Panel Discussion with introduction and moderation by Hunter O’Hanian featuring Stanley Stellar, Ellen Shumsky, Jonathan Ned Katz, and Michela Griffo.

Gay Life in 1970s NYC was a program which ran in conjunction with The 1970s: The Blossoming of a Queer Enlightenment. The 1970s explored the vibrant and liberating decade following the Stonewall Riots in 1969. This historic exhibition featured over 115 works from the Museum’s extensive collection of over 24,000 objects including artwork made during this significant period in LGBTQ history. Works were also borrowed from the Lesbian Herstory Archives and the Fales Library. The 1970s explored themes of political activism, body/self, fashion/style, and sexual freedom/expression.

Since her early works of the 1980’s, Michela Griffo has been creating drawings and paintings in a figurative tradition that echo the political and layered meanings found in history painting, historical portraiture painting, and in Dutch still lives. “My works are fairy tales for the 21st century. They offer a commentary on what I call the ‘fictional narrative’ society has chosen to construct and believe; while at the same time calling attention to the truth.”

Johnathan Ned Katz attended Antioch College, the College City of New York, the New School, and Hunter College. Katz is a historian of human sexuality. His scholarship and teaching focus on changes in the social construction of sexuality over time.

Ellen Shumsky was a young, closeted Brooklyn-born school teacher studying photography in France when the Gay Liberation Front was formed in the summer of 1969. She immediately returned from France and spent the next three years immersed in GLF and Radicalesbian activism under the name Ellen Bedoz. Her photos appeared in the GLF newspaper Come Out! as well as in other underground publications and counterculture anthologies of the time. She was one of the authors of the lesbian feminist manifesto “The Woman Identified Woman” and a founding member of Radicalesbians.

Brooklyn-born Stanley Stellar is considered one of the iconic photographers of the early period of gay liberation.

Having focused on graphic design and photography while studying at the Parsons School of Design, Stellar’s professional portfolio includes book and editorial design, as well as art direction for numerous magazines and publishing houses. His work has been shown in galleries throughout the United States and Europe, including the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art.

Hunter O’Hanian served as the director of the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art from 2012-2016. Prior to that time, he served for three years as Vice President of Institutional Advancement and Executive Director of the Foundation for Massachusetts College of Art and Design. He led two renowned artists' residencies programs, having served as the President of Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Aspen, CO, and Executive Director of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, MA. O'Hanian holds a BA from Boston College, a JD from Suffolk University School of Law, and an honorary doctorate from the Art Institute of Boston.

 

Panel Discussion:

The 2nd Wave: Feminist Legacies


The 2nd Wave: Feminist Legacies with introduction and moderation by Deborah Bright featuring Flavia Rando, Leah DeVun, and Clarity Haynes.

The 2nd Wave: Feminist Legacies is a program which ran in conjunction with The 1970s: The Blossoming of a Queer Enlightenment. The 1970s explored the vibrant and liberating decade following the Stonewall Riots in 1969. This historic exhibition featured over 115 works from the Museum’s extensive collection of over 24,000 objects including artwork made during this significant period in LGBTQ history. Works were borrowed from the Lesbian Herstory Archives and the Fales Library.The 1970s explored themes of political activism, body/self, fashion/style, and sexual freedom/expression.

Leah DeVun is an artist and historian living in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has been featured in Artforum, Huffington Post, Capricious, LA Weekly, Art Papers, Hyperallergic, Feministing.com, Gallerist, New York Magazine, and Modern Painters, among other publications, and at venues such as the ONE Archives Gallery and Museum, She Works Flexible Gallery, the Houston Center for Photography, the Contemporary Austin, Leslie-Lohman Museum, Blanton Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and MoMA PS1. DeVun received her Ph.D. from Columbia University and is currently an associate professor at Rutgers University.

Clarity Haynes lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has been shown in solo exhibitions at Tabla Rasa Gallery, Bogigian Gallery, and Artists’ House Gallery, and in group exhibitions at the ‘temporary Museum, the Allentown Art Museum, and Hopkins House Gallery of Contemporary Art. She has received grants from numerous sources including the Brooklyn Arts Council, the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund and the Leeway Foundation. She holds a BA from Temple University, where she studied film production, a Certificate in Fine Arts from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and an MFA in Painting from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York.

Flavia Rando Ph.D., is an art historian who teaches Women’s and Gender Studies. A lesbian activist since 1969, she was a member of the Gay Liberation Front and Radicalesbians. As an academic activist, she has organized and served on numerous committees, task forces and panels. She was co-editor of Gay and Lesbian Presence in Art and Art History and, in 2008, the co-chair of the Clark Institute Colloquium, How Queer Is Art History? She is the editor of Portrait of a Decade: 1968-1978, for which she wrote the essay, “Witness to a Revolution,” and she contributed the essay “Between Bohemia and Revolution,” to Smash the Church, Smash the State: Forty Years of Gay Revolution, edited by Tommi Avicolli Mecca. In 2011, she inaugurated the Lesbian Studies Institute at the Lesbian Herstory Archives.

Deborah Bright received her MFA from the University of Chicago in 1975. Her works have been shown internationally. She has received grants and fellowships from the Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute, Radcliffe College; Art Matters; National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities; Lightwork; New England Foundation for the Arts; Massachusetts Cultural Council; Somerville Arts Council; Illinois Arts Council; Mellon Foundation; David and Reva Logan Foundation. Since 1989, she has been a professor in the Photography and Art History Departments at the Rhode Island School of Design.

 

Medium of Desire:

Medium of Desire: An International Anthology of Photography and Video


Using human beauty, desire, Eros, and sexuality, this new photography based exhibition reveals that cultural differences, whether defined by national borders, sexual orientation, or gender identification, can be simultaneously vast yet familiar. Regardless of one’s sexual orientation or country of origin, feelings of desire, when successfully represented, can serve to minimize our differences and bring us closer. By using the theme “desire,” this exhibition draws together the work of fourteen contemporary artists from China, Japan, Greece, Russia, Holland, Italy, Germany, Great Britain, and the U.S., as expressed through the medium of photography and video.

 

Medium of Desire:

Artist Matthew Morracco in conversation with Museum Director Hunter O’Hanian


Artist Matthew Morracco in conversation with Museum Director Hunter O'Hanian during the "Medium of Desire" exhibition at the Leslie-Lohman Museum for Gay and Lesbian Art.

 

Medium of Desire:

Artist Alexander Kargaltsev in conversation with Museum Director Hunter O'Hanian



Artist Alexander Kargaltsev in conversation with Museum Director Hunter O'Hanian during the "Medium of Desire" exhibition at the Leslie-Lohman Museum for Gay and Lesbian Art.

 

Medium of Desire:

Artist Jessica Yatrofsky in conversation with Museum Director Hunter O’Hanian


 

Artist Jessica Yatrofsky in conversation with Museum Director Hunter O'Hanian during the "Medium of Desire" exhibition at the Leslie-Lohman Museum for Gay and Lesbian Art.

 

Medium of Desire:

Museum Director Hunter O’Hanian on “Medium of Desire”


 

Museum Director Hunter O'Hanian during the "Medium of Desire" exhibition at the Leslie-Lohman Museum for Gay and Lesbian Art.

 

Speaker Series:

Speaker Series with Amelia Jones


The Spring Speakers Series continues with art historian Amelia Jones. Chair of the Visual Culture department at McGill University, Jones is one of the most well recognized queer, anti-racist, feminist art historians working today. She has lectured throughout the world and the author of numerous publications.

The talk will explore the performance and performative self-imaging practice of the German artist Ulay, who has lived and worked in Amsterdam and Ljubljana since the late 1960s. Jones will explore the qualities of generosity, vulnerability, and relationality as having queer feminist effects (and affects).

 

Speaker Series:

Speaker Series with Barbara Hammer


"The Hidden Hammer" lecture will show and talk about the breadth Hammer's work beyond film and video.

Barbara Hammer is a visual artist working primarily in film and video. She has made over 80 moving image works in a career that spans 40 years. She is considered a pioneer of queer cinema.

Funding for this series has been received in part from the generous support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature

 

Lecture:

George Platt Lynes: A Life in Portraits By Allen Ellenzweig


Allen Ellenzweig gave a presentation about the life of the extraordinary twentieth-century American photographer, George Platt Lynes at the Leslie Lohman Museum on November 18, 2015. Using a wide range of illustrated material, Allen Ellenzweig will offer portraits of the amazing cast of characters who peopled Lynes’ relatively short but exciting life (1907-1955), including Gertrude Stein, Jean Cocteau, Lincoln Kirstein, Katherine Anne Porter, Marianne Moore, and the PaJaMa photography collective (Paul Cadmus, Jared French, and Margaret French). Ellenzweig will also discuss all the major genres in which Lynes excelled: celebrity portraiture, ballet images, Surreal imaginings from Greek mythology, fashion photography, and, most especially, pictures of the male nude. Lynes created thousands of images of the male nude over three decades, few of which were exhibited or published in his lifetime. Through pictures and commentary, this presentation will describe how professional and personal friendships established cosmopolitan gay life in New York and Paris in the decades before and after World War II.

 

Lecture:

Romaine Brooks: A Life


Cassandra Langer, the 21st century biographer of Romaine Brooks, is joined by art historian James Saslow and screenwriter/translator Suzanne Stroh on a panel as part of a book launch at the Leslie-Lohman Museum for "Romaine Brooks: A Life"

 

Speaker Series:

Speaker Series with Attila Richard Lukacs


Attila Richard Lukacs is a Canadian artist known predominantly for his paintings of male skinheads, primates and American military cadets during the early 1990s whose brutally explicit work often shocks and provokes painters and critics alike.

 

Speaker Series:

Cassils


The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art Speaker Series hosted Cassils for an artist talk titled “The Body as Social Sculpture”, which took place on Wednesday, April 22nd from 6:30 to 8:30pm.

 

Speaker Series:

Jennifer Tyburczy & Artists from “Irreverent: A Celebration of Censorship”


Part of the Leslie-Lohman Speakers Series, artists Baris Barlas, Alex Donis, Michelle Handelman, Kimi Tayler, and Barbara Nitke join curator, Jennifer Tyburczy to discuss current exhibition Irreverent: A Celebration of Censorship. The artists and curator will consider the historical, cultural, and political ways in which censorship of queer artwork has inspired and expanded LGBTQ art in the U.S. and around the world.


Walking Tour:

Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Wall
In this series of clips, New York-based artist and curator Robert W. Richards walks us through "Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Wall" exhibited at the Leslie-Lohman Museum in New York from March 28 to May 25, 2014 and the Stonewall National Museum and Archives in Fort Lauderdale from February 4 to March 8, 2015.


Colt and Quaintance


Antonio Lopez


Robert W. Richards


Mel Odom


Breyette


Robert W. Richards


Lecture:

The Theater and the Theater Outside the Theater: Robert Wilson in Conversation


After a short film highlighting Wilson’s work, there will be a conversation between Robert Wilson, Jonathan David Katz, and Peter Harvey talking about poignant moments of Wilson’s career, the relationship between sexuality and creativity, and the Watermill Center—a unique environment for young and emerging artists from around the world to explore new ideas. This talk is a rare opportunity to hear Robert Wilson as he seldom speaks publically in New York. The Museum is honored that he has chosen our organization for this special speaking engagement. Wilson was very involved with the Museum through his support of the Paul Thek exhibition that would not have been possible without the support of the Watermill Center.

 

Speaker:

Duane Michals: I am Gay


Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art New York, NY Duane Michals is an American photographer. Michals' work makes innovative use of photo-sequences, often incorporating text to examine emotion and philosophy.


Lecture:

A History of the History of The Homoerotic Photograph - book and talk by Allen Ellenzweig


To celebrate the paperback publication of the 1992 landmark illustrated history, The Homoerotic Photograph: Male Images from Durieu/Delacroix to Mapplethorpe, author Allen Ellenzweig tells of the 15-year journey that it took to publish the original book and presents some of his favorite homoerotic images, both from the book and elsewhere. Allen Ellenzweig is an arts critic and cultural commentator currently researching the life of twentieth-century photographer George Platt Lynes.

 

Artist Talk:

Kent Monkman in conversation with Jonathan David Katz


Kent Monkman is one of the most celebrated queer artists working in Canada today. With a foot in each of our defining binaries, be they male/female, past/present, Aboriginal/European, Canadian/American, Monkman's work underscores that contact always leaves both parties changed. Operating at the intersection of colonial history and post-colonial culture, Monkman's work not only calls into question our received histories but demonstrates we are all necessarily hybrids.

 

Lecture:

Making History, Making Art: The Work of Jonathan Ned Katz


Making History, Making Art: The Work of Jonathan Ned Katz at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in New York City. On view February 16 - March 31, 2013.

 

Artist & Curator Talk:

Rare & Raw and Making History, Making Art: The Work of Jonathan Ned Katz


Artists Nina Levitt, Tara Mateik, Ken Moffatt and Jonathan Ned Katz in discussion with curators Steph Rogerson, Kelly McCray and Jonathan David Katz. Hosted by the Queer Caucus of Art at the Leslie-Lohman Museum.

 

Artist & Curator Panel:

From the Diaries

 

 

Artist & Curator Panel:

Lesbians Seeing Lesbians: Selections from the Artist & Curator Panel


 

Artist & Curator Panel:

Lesbians Seeing Lesbians - Part 1


Excerpts from the Artist & Curator Panel Discussion for the Lesbians Seeing Lesbians: Building Community in Early Feminist Photography exhibition at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, September 14 - October 22, 2011.

 

Artist & Curator Panel:

Lesbians Seeing Lesbians - Part 2


Excerpts from the Artist & Curator Panel Discussion for the Lesbians Seeing Lesbians: Building Community in Early Feminist Photography exhibition at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, September 14 - October 22, 2011.

 

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